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Tag Archives: hawaiian

Paul T. Frankl set designed for Kane Kraft

Paul T. Frankl set designed for Kane Kraft

Mel and I picked this set up recently. Paul T. Frankl designed this set for Kane Kraft sometime in the late 40’s or early 50’s. I have always wanted a vintage bamboo dining set and this was the exact style I had in mind.

As you can see, the set was a little grubby from years of use. Most of the filth came off with cleaner, but the backs of the chairs had years of oil and grease built up on the surfaces. I cleaned them and resprayed them with polyurethane.

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I have yet to clean this piece but that is all it should need.

We purchased this with plans to pick it up the following week. When we returned the store owner brought to our attention that there was a matching sideboard if we were interested! Yes please!

The top of this piece is fantastic!

So much storage, and we love those knobs.

The wood used appears to be solid Koa or Narra. The sideboard is solid and heavy. The grain of the wood glows like beams of sunlight in the sun.

I am currently on the hunt for appropriate fabric to recover the seats in.

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Charles McPhee

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This piece is titled “Bora Bora”.

I was surfing the internet and came across a piece of art that I was drawn to. It was a piece done on black velvet by Charles McPhee like the one above. I have always been attracted to velvet art, or I should say good velvet art. I have yet to acquire a piece of velvet art but I felt the need to learn more about this artist. Here is some insight on him:

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This was the only photo I could find of him. Obviously this was towards the end of his life.

Charles McPhee was born in Australian and went to Western Samoa in 1939 as a muscular young signwriter and mandolin player in search of adventure. There he married a lady named Toila and took a wartime job as a police officer. But he wanted to be a painter. He practiced his painting skills on American servicemen and warships, and the couple named their son, Paul Gauguin McPhee. The marriage ended and McPhee moved to Tahiti, where he learned the difficult and painstaking technique of painting in oils on velvet from American expert Edgar Leeteg. He fell for one of his mentor’s models, Elizabeth. She became his model for a series of Tahitian Girl, which he continued to paint for an eager public after the couple settled in New Zealand in 1951. Those who have seen versions of Tahitian Girl over the years find it romantic that the girl in the painting never seemed to age along with the model, Elizabeth. In his eyes, she retained her youthful beauty. His son, Paul McPhee, was unable yesterday to cast light on the mystery. “It’s a hard one. Yes, Elizabeth posed for father on several occasions and, yes, the look of the women stayed the same. “Elizabeth was beautiful … but we can’t infer he used her as a body for all his paintings.” Paul McPhee said he had a collection of his father’s paintings. “I had to buy them off my father because he never had any … If he kept one it would be sold. Someone would come to the house and say, ‘I’ll take that one’ and he would sell it to them.” McPhee died in November 2002 at the age of 92.

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I know but we are all adults here! Anyways, he seems to be able to make his paintings look soo life-like. This one is called “Dusky Maiden”.

He was such a prolific artist and produced such cool pieces. I guess I am really keen on his work because of our efforts in our Tiki Room. We would love to have one of his pieces in our collection but they are not that common and can be kind of expensive.

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The black of the velvet really makes the imagery jump off the canvas. It is obvious he was an artist who was a master of his technique, and showed a fine eye for the human form in sensual portrayals of women and athletic warriors.

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He mostly painted Samoa natives but occasionally painted other things like landscapes and clowns.

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Velvet art was pretty common in a lot of the trendy Tiki restaurants during the 50’s.

    I know but we are all adults here! Anyways, he seems to be able to make his paintings look soo life like.

It was interesting learning about Mr.McPhee and to see a sampling of his work. It would really be something to be able to paint like him. I will look upon the piece I found on-line with a little more interest.

Source:

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=3006993

Vintage Hula Girl Bamboo Curtain

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This is how it looks outside the Tiki Room.

Mel and I saw this on Craigslist in Sacramento and thought it would help make the Tiki Room more secluded by separating it from our living room.

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The woman Mel and I purchased this from worked in the Hawaiian travel industry and she said this was made specifically for one of the local hotels. When the hotel was renovated they acquired it. She said it is unique since it was produced just for the hotel. This thing is like 9 ft tall and almost 5 feet wide. This is a great addition to the room and really gives it a tropical feel.

Tiki Bar Update

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Today, I performed a quick resto on these pieces. I used my old faithful “Awesome” cleaner that really removes staining, dirt & grease. I just spray it on, let it sit for a few seconds and wipe it off. It is breathtaking in its effectiveness.

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Plenty of room for alcohol!

After I cleaned the stools and the bar, I used Clear Gloss spray polyurethane to reseal and refresh these pieces. After the many years of use, these pieces were dull and the polyurethane brought them back to life.

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First thing tomorrow, I will be over at Bill’s at B&T Upholstery to get these in the works. You can see the upholstery in the background, this will match our other rattan.

Now off to Ebay to purchase some cool tropical postcards for the top of the bar!

Hawaiian Chalkware Lamps & Rewire

Mel and I picked these up at a local antique store and knew they would look fantastic in our Tiki room. As you can see from the before photo they were really dusty and needed some freshening up. Per my previous posts you know that I love to re-finish old lamps. These needed to be cleaned and repainted. I took a little creative license when it came to the repaint and I think they turned out great! Here is how they turned out:

Here she is. We were able to get these venetian shades but they were lime green and I knew that would look too strange so I painted them to match.

Here is the hula man. They both turned out well.

I even added facial features such as eyes, eyebrows and lips. When you redo a lamp don’t be afraid to add your own twist.

After both of these were re-finished I wasn’t comfortable with the “burn down my house” cord that was still attached to both. I decided to run over to Lowes to pick up a couple of lamp rewire kits so I would not have any worries when using these.

Required items: 1 faulty wired lamp, 1 rewire kit, cross tip and flat tip screwdriver & wire strippers/side cutters.

The first step is to dismantle the existing light assembly. I always recommend that you hang onto all pieces of the old lamp till you are done. These rewire kits you purchase are generic and sometimes the hardware doesn’t work with your lamp so you may have to reuse some of the cosmetic pieces.

Remove lamp harp, light bulb sleeve and shroud.

Next you need to disconnect the two wires connected to the light assembly.

Remove the rest of the hardware from the upper part of the lamp. Leaving just the wires sticking out of the top.

The next part is to cut the plug portion of the old cord off and push it through the base of the lamp so it can be pulled through the top of the lamp later. Now take the new cord and feed it through the base of the lamp (once the new cord is though the base tie a knot in the cord but make sure it’s loose so you can adjust it later) and twist the ends of the new cord together with the old cord. This will allow you to pull the new cord through the lamp when you pull the old cord out through the top. It is important that when you try to pull the new cord through the lamp that as you pull on the old cord you are pushing on the new cord.

Here you can see the new wire pulled through the lamp. Once you give yourself a little slack on top adjust the knot on the bottom to be tight against the base. The knot prevents the wire from getting pulled out if someone tugs on the cord.

I had to use the old base hardware but I was able to replace the harp holder and lower bowl for the bulb.

The next step is to re-attach the wires to the light assembly, slide cardboard insert over light assembly and then the metal sleeve and push the whole assembly into the light assembly bowl till it feels secure, it should lock/snap into place. Install the new harp and attach the lampshade and screw on the finial and you are all done. You just rewired a lamp! Not too hard huh?

Now I don’t have to keep the fire extinguisher handy when these are on.

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