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Tiny Dancer

dash

Now that Mel and I are a part of the classic car crowd with our new ’55 Fairlane we have started decorating it, yep, as though the house isn’t enough we have now started decorating our car. Anyways, the first iconic thing we wanted to add was a vintage Hawaiian Hula Dancer for our dash. I searched high and low and most of the ones I found were not very old. I didn’t want a reproduction. I wanted one that had brought some other driver years of enjoyment.

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I was able to find this little cutie but she had been dropped and glued back together at the feet with a visible crack.

As you can see the crack needs filling and repainted.

As you can see the crack needs to be filled and repainted.

As you can see the paint is also uneven and not done very well. I decided to freshen the whole piece up.

As you can see the paint is also uneven and not done very well. I decided to freshen the whole piece up.

After a short time I was able to complete my restoration of this vintage hula dancer. I think it looks better then it did and can’t wait to place it on the dash and watch her shake!

I also changed up her Lei, I think it looks better than the original.

As you can see the previous damage has been repaired. With the new paint it looks great!

As you can see the previous damage has been repaired. With the new paint it looks great! Oh, I also added some nail polish to add a little more detail.

Well this little one will soon be appearing on our dash. Onto the next resto.

Well this little one will soon be appearing on our dash. Onto the next resto.

Here is a clip to celebrate this momentous occasion (staring our favorite redhead).

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Hawaiian Chalkware Lamps & Rewire

Mel and I picked these up at a local antique store and knew they would look fantastic in our Tiki room. As you can see from the before photo they were really dusty and needed some freshening up. Per my previous posts you know that I love to re-finish old lamps. These needed to be cleaned and repainted. I took a little creative license when it came to the repaint and I think they turned out great! Here is how they turned out:

Here she is. We were able to get these venetian shades but they were lime green and I knew that would look too strange so I painted them to match.

Here is the hula man. They both turned out well.

I even added facial features such as eyes, eyebrows and lips. When you redo a lamp don’t be afraid to add your own twist.

After both of these were re-finished I wasn’t comfortable with the “burn down my house” cord that was still attached to both. I decided to run over to Lowes to pick up a couple of lamp rewire kits so I would not have any worries when using these.

Required items: 1 faulty wired lamp, 1 rewire kit, cross tip and flat tip screwdriver & wire strippers/side cutters.

The first step is to dismantle the existing light assembly. I always recommend that you hang onto all pieces of the old lamp till you are done. These rewire kits you purchase are generic and sometimes the hardware doesn’t work with your lamp so you may have to reuse some of the cosmetic pieces.

Remove lamp harp, light bulb sleeve and shroud.

Next you need to disconnect the two wires connected to the light assembly.

Remove the rest of the hardware from the upper part of the lamp. Leaving just the wires sticking out of the top.

The next part is to cut the plug portion of the old cord off and push it through the base of the lamp so it can be pulled through the top of the lamp later. Now take the new cord and feed it through the base of the lamp (once the new cord is though the base tie a knot in the cord but make sure it’s loose so you can adjust it later) and twist the ends of the new cord together with the old cord. This will allow you to pull the new cord through the lamp when you pull the old cord out through the top. It is important that when you try to pull the new cord through the lamp that as you pull on the old cord you are pushing on the new cord.

Here you can see the new wire pulled through the lamp. Once you give yourself a little slack on top adjust the knot on the bottom to be tight against the base. The knot prevents the wire from getting pulled out if someone tugs on the cord.

I had to use the old base hardware but I was able to replace the harp holder and lower bowl for the bulb.

The next step is to re-attach the wires to the light assembly, slide cardboard insert over light assembly and then the metal sleeve and push the whole assembly into the light assembly bowl till it feels secure, it should lock/snap into place. Install the new harp and attach the lampshade and screw on the finial and you are all done. You just rewired a lamp! Not too hard huh?

Now I don’t have to keep the fire extinguisher handy when these are on.

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