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How About a Little Television?

How About a Little Television?

I came across this really cool set of miniature TV’s while searching on Etsy.

This is the one that initially caught my eye! This was listed as a pencil holder, but I think it would look better as a Ficus planter. I knew I had heard the name Betty Furness before, then I remembered I had a thermometer set by her as well! She was an American actress, consumer advocate and current affairs commentator.

The thermometer set has very cool imagery on the box. I need to bust that thing out and use it.

Next is this fantastic little salt and pepper set. Check out the imagery on that box!

These little salt and pepper shakers sit flush on the top of the tv until you turn the knob on the front which raises them up.

Next we have the same television but in a brown color. It’s cool because it matches the atomic television in the background. This little set up even came with instructions on how to place your own photo into it!

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1970’s JVC Videosphere 3240 “Turns you on….even when it’s off”

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Mel and I came across this television a while back. This is such a cool addition to our collection.

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The sphere shape of this television gives this television such a space age feel.

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Here is the chain I will have to hang it by. I am not sure how I plan to route the satellite hookup to this so it is functional, but I am sure I can figure it out.

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Plugged it in and it powers on and has sound!

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This television has some weight to it, but I think if I use a heavier chain it should hang just fine.

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Here are some original ads for this space age wonder!

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1959 Philco Safari H-2010

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Presenting the Philco Safari Model H-2010, the World’s First Transistor Battery-Powered Television. Take it anywhere-enjoy it everywhere! It’s the all-transistor Philco Safari. 15lbs. of portable fun. Fine-screen picture, glare-proof hood, built-in antenna, long-life battery, rich leather case…a fabulous “first” from Philco! $250

Mel and I recently picked this little fella up and love it! It has such cool styling and real genuine top grade cow hide. This is the first truly portable transistor television!

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They came in two colors, black and tan. The black seems to be more desirable but I like the tan.

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Here is the black version.

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Ours fired up just fine. The great thing is that since it is a transistor television you don’t have to be afraid to plug it in even if it has sat a while.

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We are soo happy that all the knobs, hood and antenna are all there. Unfortunately, you find these without the hood pretty regularly.  The leather on this unit is very clean without much wear.

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The screen you see is a reflection of a smaller screen below the visible screen. I don’t have a converter hooked up right now so all you see is static.

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Here is the battery that allowed these to become wireless. No surprise mine is long gone.

Here is a great commercial and some ads…

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Here we have Buffy and Maximilian watching their Safari while cruising the lake in their Chris Craft, lucky!

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Cool idea taking it to the beach but if I recall sand and electronics are arch enemies.

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The Death of the Vintage TV Lamp

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To me, TV lamps are pieces of art. There were so many different ones made by a lot of different manufacturers (Royal Fleet, Maddux, Lane, Texans Inc., Kron, Fuhry & Sons, Jacquelin, Royal Haeger…). These lamps became essential once televisions started showing up in homes. When watching the early televisions you had to watch them in almost complete darkness because of the low luminosity, making low light viewing a genuine benefit. The common belief was that watching the television in complete darkness caused eyestrain, hence the birth of the television lamp.

Sylvania came out with this new revolutionary HaloLight feature which helped eliminate eyestrain and the need for TV lamps.

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Mel and I were contacted by one of our friends who informed us that she came into possession of the very rare Sylvania HaloLight television. She asked if we were interested and of course you know what we said. I shot over to pick it up. The cabinet on this unit is in good shape for its age. I plan to refinish it so it is perfect. I love the lightning bolt on the right side.

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 Once this is refinished it will look great.

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The control panel is pretty clean on this unit. I plan to replace the fabric with something a little less ratty.

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 Here she is all lit up! Yup, it still works. Our friend Justin of Stellar Vintage Electronics said that if the Halo works you are ahead of the game because they are custom fluorescent tubes.

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 This unit has only one speaker so I don’t imagine it will compare to the modern televisions. If Justin can’t get this unit to work, it will be retrofitted with a modern tube and will be good to go for many more years to come.

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Whatever we decide to do with this unit, it is nice that another set has been saved from the junk pile.

Here are a couple of 50’s commercials of the Sylvania HaloLight.

Stellar Vintage Electronics

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These models features an opaque white plastic mask around the picture concealing a neon lamp. The gimmick was that you had a TV lamp built right into the screen!

These models feature an opaque white plastic mask around the picture concealing a neon lamp.  The gimmick was that you had a TV lamp built right into the screen!  This is super rare and on display at Midway Antique Mall.

Hello all!

Mel and I have had the good fortune to meet a guy by the name of Justin with Stellar Vintage Electronics.  Justin is skilled in vintage electronics repair.  He has a shop inside Midway Antique Mall and is used by many dealers and customers at the mall.  Recently, Mel and I became aware of a 1956 Sylvania Halolight television that Justin modified.  Justin specializes in modern color TV conversions into vintage TV cabinets and this is a great example.

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This television turned out fantastic.  When we first saw this we were soo blown away by the picture and the fact that it works with a modern remote.  Justin also makes sure that it has all the modern connectivity that current televisions have on the back.

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This is Justin’s next project.  This is a 1958 Olympic Hi-Fi Combo.  Justin is going to have this unit completely functional including the record player and radio.  A neat thing Justin is doing with this television conversion is he plans to make the vintage controls work with the modern television conversion. Justin’s conversions are seamless and we think his abilities will be valued in the antique world.  I have had many vintage televisions and had many of them repaired.  The bad thing is vintage televisions are prone to breaking down.  With what Justin does, it allows all of us mid century decor lovers to incorporate modern technology disguised in a vintage television cabinet.  Justin just started a blog where he will showcase what he does so please support his efforts because he is not just a repair guy but in my opinion an artist keeping these pieces alive and in living rooms for years to come!

 

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